5 Best Ways To Clean Up Guinea Pig Poop (Explained Now)

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If you’re a guinea pig parent, then you know that cleaning up guinea pig poop is just a part of the job. But what’s the best way to do it?

There are a few different methods that people use, and each one has its own benefits and drawbacks. In this blog post, you’ll learn the five best ways to clean up guinea pig poop.

a picture of a guinea pig wondering about the best ways to clean up guinea pig poop

1. Sweep It Up

a sarcastic message about guinea pig poop from a guinea pig
The sooner you can decide on a cleaning system to help you pick up all that guinea pig poop that’ll be piling up in your fur babies’ enclosure, the better off you (and your piggies) will be.

This is probably one of the most straight forward methods to clean guinea pig poo out of the cage. All you need is a small hand broom or dust pan, which you can easily find at a dollar store, Wal-Mart, or grocery store.

One thing to keep in mind with this method is that you’ll want to be careful not to sweep too close to your guinea pigs – or to use sudden movements while you’re sweeping.

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After your piggies have gotten used to you being in the cage with them, they shouldn’t mind you cleaning up around them. But if you’re just starting out, it’s best to err on the side of caution and give them some space.

Another thing to consider is that this method can be a little messy. If there are a lot of pellets or other small pieces of bedding in the cage, they can easily get swept up along with the poo.

Another downside of this method is that it can be a little bit time consuming if you have a lot of poop to clean up.

Basically, this is a fantastic, budget-friendly method if you don’t have very many guinea pigs and you’re looking for a quick way to clean up their poo. But if you have more piggies, or if you’re looking for a less messy method, then you might want to try one of the other options on this list.

Pros:

  • Straightforward
  • Doesn’t require any special equipment
  • Easy-to-find materials

Cons:

  • Can be messy
  • You have to be careful not to scare your furry friends
  • Can be time consuming if you have a lot of piggies

2. Use A Vacuum

This is another fairly straightforward method, and it has the added benefit of being less messy (and a lot quicker) than sweeping.

For this method, you’ll need a small handheld vacuum – one that’s specifically designed for cleaning up pet hair and debris is ideal.

Or even better – a shop vac (that’s my personal recommendation). You can find these vacuums at most pet stores, or online.

But, you need to be careful. Although some handheld vacuums work really well, others can easily clog with hay or too many cavy poops. And if you have a lot of piggies, you might have to empty out the handheld vacuum several times before you’re finished with the job.

(No offense to fur babies. But, no one wants to spend any more time poop cleaning than they have to…)

Because of this, most pet parents swear by shop vacs. Not only do they pick up piggie poops quickly and easily (without clogging, mind you), but they can also be used around the house for other things. Like cleaning out your car or getting the cobwebs out of those hard-to-reach places.

Compare 3 of the best affordable guinea pig poop vacuums on ONE PAGE here.

To use this method, do the following:

  • Relocate your piggies to a play pen or other safe area (your little friends might get a little stressed from the noise – whether it’s a handheld or a shop vac).
  • Turn on the vacuum and carefully run it over the soiled areas of the cage.
  • Use the attachments that come with the vacuum to get into nooks and crannies of the enclosure, if necessary.
  • Once you’re finished, empty out the vacuum canister or bag.

Overall, this is a good method if you want a quick and easy clean-up. Just be careful that the vacuum you choose can handle the job and that you keep your piggies in a place that’s calm and quiet while you’re tidying up.

And remember if you have a lot of piggies, or if you just want to make sure you get every last bit of poop, consider using a shop vac. Shop vacs are amazing for this job – they have lots of power and don’t clog as easily as some handheld vacuums.

Pros:

  • Quick and easy
  • Less messy than sweeping
  • Materials are pretty cheap
  • Great for cleaning up after huge herds of piggies

Cons:

  • Can clog if you’re not careful
  • You have to be careful not to scare your furry friends
  • Some vacuums don’t work as well as others
  • Vacuuming can be a little loud
  • Requires a financial investment
  • Shop vacs are big and storage can be an issue

3. Scoop It Up

Now, if you’re looking for a less noisy, but more labor intensive way to clean up your piggies’ poop, then this might be the method for you.

All you need is a small metal or plastic ladle – something like the kind you would use for a punch bowl or a soup tureen. And it’s best if the ladle has a long handle, so you don’t have to reach or bend over into the cage too far (and risk throwing out your back).

Once you have your ladle, the rest is pretty simple. Just scoop up as much of the poop as you can and deposit it in a trash bin or other designated area.

However, because this method is more hands-on, it can be a little more time consuming – especially if you have a lot of piggies.

Pros:

  • This method is pretty quiet, so it won’t bother your piggies.
  • It’s also a pretty low-cost way to clean up guinea pig poop. All you need is a ladle, which you can find at most kitchen or department stores…or even in your own kitchen (just make sure you only use it for scooping up guinea pig poop and nothing else).

Cons:

  • Won’t necessarily get every last bit of poop (ladles aren’t as efficient as brooms or vacuums)
  • Can take FOR-EVA…especially if you have a lot of piggies.
  • Requires more manual labor than some of the other methods
  • Scooping poop can be kind of gross

4. Use Your Hands

This is probably the oldest and most classic way to clean up guinea pig poop – using your hands.

Now, if you’re brave enough (or have a high tolerance for all things…well, a little gross), this might be the method for you.

Now, you’d think that this approach would be a time suck, but it’s actually not. Once you get your rhythm down, most pet parents say that they prefer picking up poops up by hand. Some even say that it’s quicker and less annoying than dealing with brooms and vacuums.

(Hey, different strokes for different folks, am I right?)

All you need to do is put on a pair of gloves (don’t be ashamed to whip out those yellow rubber ones), get in there and start picking up the poop.

Once you have it all collected, just deposit it in the trash bin or whatever receptacle you’ve designated for poop.

Pros:

  • You’re in control – can pick up every last bit of poop this way
  • Inexpensive – all you need is a pair of gloves
  • No machines needed, so it’s low-maintenance
  • Can go pretty quickly once you get the hang of it

Cons:

  • It’s pretty hands-on (literally) – some people don’t like getting that close to their piggies’ poop
  • You have to be careful not to touch your face or eyes while you’re picking up the poop

If you’re comfortable with it and don’t mind getting your hands dirty, this is probably the best way to clean up guinea pig poop. Just be prepared for a little bit of a mess and some potential hygiene concerns.

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Stop getting dirty looks from your piggies, because you forgot to do something for them...AGAIN. These colorful, chore charts will help you keep track of when to feed your fuzz butts, clean their cages, and much more. 

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5. Shake Them Out

This approach is really only effective if you use fleece liners or noodle bath mats as bedding for you fur babies. Since you have the ability to lift out the entire liner or mat and shake it out, all of the poop will come with it.

Now, this might not be the most sanitary way to clean up your piggies’ messes (especially if you’re shaking it over your kitchen sink), but it is one of the easiest.

All you need to do is lift out the liner or mat, shake it out and then replace it in the cage.

The main problem with this technique is that it can get a little annoying pulling all of your cavies’ toys and huts out of the cage for daily spot cleaning, just to get to the liner or mat. But, if you’re willing to put up with that, then this is a pretty low-effort way to clean guinea pig poop.

Pros:

  • You don’t have to touch the poop at all – just lift and shake
  • This method is also quiet, so it won’t disturb your piggies
  • Can be done relatively quickly

Cons:

  • You have to do it every day – or at least several times a day
  • Can be a little bit of a hassle to get everything out of the cage just to shake out the liner/mat
  • The poop might fly all over the place, so you’ll need to clean up any messes made or take everything outside for the shaking (hope you have a good back!)

Figure Out Your Guinea Pigs’ Pooping Habits

a reminder that owners need to figure out their guinea pigs pooping schedule to know when and how often to clean up the guinea pig poop
Proper planning will save you a lot of time and headaches when it comes to guinea pig care.

No matter which method (or combination of methods) you use, it’s important that you keep on top of your piggies’ pooping habits. That way you’ll know when (and how often) to clean your guinea pigs’ poops.

The average healthy piggie poops around 100 times a day. But, that’s average. What’s normal for your guinea pigs might be different.

Keep an eye on how often they’re going and adjust your cleaning routine accordingly.

That way, you’ll always be prepared to clean up their messes as soon as they happen without letting them build up- and nobody (piggies or pet parents) will have to deal with any nasty surprises.

Several factors can affect how often your guinea pigs poop, including:

  • age
  • size (babies poop at different rates that adult cavies)
  • health or digestive issues
  • type of food/nutrition

You also have to consider how many cavies you have. The more you own, the more poop you’ll have to deal with on a daily basis.

Once you know what to expect, it’ll be a lot easier to plan ahead and make sure that your guinea pigs’ cage is always clean – no matter what.

The best way to do this is to observe them and figure out when they’re typically pooping the most.

Why Is It Important To Clean Your Guinea Pigs’ Cage?

Nobody likes to live in a messy environment, and the same goes for our furry friends.

A dirty cage can lead to all sorts of problems for your guinea pigs, including:

  • increased risk of illness or infection
  • poor hygiene (which can lead to skin problems or other health issues)
  • stress from living in an unclean environment

Poop can be dangerous for your guinea pigs if it’s not cleaned up on a regular basis.

That’s because cavy noses are so sensitive that the ammonia from their urine and poops can build up quickly.

And when that happens, it creates an unsafe living environment that can make your piggies sick.

Bottom line: Cleaning your guinea pigs’ cage is not only important for their health and well-being, but it’s also essential for keeping your home clean and free of ammonia fumes.

FAQS About Cleaning Up Guinea Pig Poop

Some guinea pig parents might have a few questions about cleaning up their piggies’ poop. Here are answers to some of the most frequently asked questions:

How Often Should You Clean Guinea Pig Poop?

It’s typically recommended that you do a full cage clean once a week and spot cleans as necessary. Of course, this will vary depending on the size of your cage, number of guinea pigs, and how often they’re pooping.

What’s the Best Way to Clean Up Guinea Pig Poop?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question – it depends on your individual situation. And the “best way” for you to clean up guinea pig poop will depend on what bedding you use, how much time you have, and how often your piggies poop.

One thing is certain.

The more piggies you own, the more often you’ll have to clean up their poop. Some popular methods include using a small handheld vacuum, scooping it up with a ladle, and using a dustpan and broom.

What Is The Easiest Way To Clean A Guinea Pig Cage?

There’s a few different ways to clean a guinea pig cage, but the easiest is probably by using using fleece liners and noodle bath mats. All you need to do is lift out the liner or mat, shake it out and then replace it in the cage.

Keep in mind, most pet parents have their own ideas about what works best, so it’s really up to you to figure out what method is easiest for you. Cleaning up guinea pig poop doesn’t have to be a difficult or time-consuming task. You just need to try out different approaches until you find one that works best for you and your pigs.

Are You Supposed To Pick Up Guinea Pig Poop?

Yes, every pet parent is supposed to pick up guinea pig poop. It’s important to keep their cage clean to prevent disease and illness. The most important thing to remember when cleaning up guinea pig poop is that it should be done frequently – at least once a day, and more often if you have multiple piggies.

Cleaning up guinea pig poop might seem like a chore, but it’s important to do it regularly to keep your piggies healthy and happy. By following the tips in this article, you can make the process as quick and easy as possible. So there’s no excuse not to do it.

Can You Touch Guinea Pig Poop?

Yes, you can touch guinea pig poop. Holding some poop in your bare hands won’t kill you, but you definitely need to wash your hands afterwards. It’s also important to keep in mind that some guinea pigs can be carriers of certain diseases, so it’s best not to take any chances.

If you have any open cuts or wounds on your hands, it’s best to avoid contact with their poops altogether by wearing gloves when you’re spot cleaning your cavies’ enclosure.

Wanna Give Your Piggies
the 5 STAR Treatment?

Stop getting dirty looks from your piggies, because you forgot to do something for them...AGAIN. These colorful, chore charts will help you keep track of when to feed your fuzz butts, clean their cages, and much more. 

FREE

Wrapping Up

So, there you have it – the five best ways to clean up guinea pig poop! Hopefully, this has given you some ideas on how to approach the task and make it a little less daunting.

Cleaning up guinea pig poop can be a little messy, but it’s a necessary evil. By using one of the methods (or combination of methods) listed above, you should be able to get the job done relatively quickly and without too much fuss.

Just remember to stay on top of your piggies’ pooping habits so that you’re never overwhelmed by the task at hand.

Do you have special approach that you use to clean up guinea pig poop? I’d love to hear about it in the comments below.

As always, thanks for reading!

Until next time…

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(n.d.). Animal Shelter | Pet Adoption Denver | Dumb Friends League. https://www.ddfl.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/Guinea-Pigs_V2.pdf

Beck, A. (2013). Guinea pigs: Keeping and caring for your pet. Enslow Pub.

Behaviour – Guinea pigs – Our pets. (n.d.). The Largest Animal Welfare Charity in the UK | RSPCA. https://www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/pets/rodents/guineapigs/behaviour

Bielfeld, Horst. Guinea Pigs: A Complete Pet Owner’s Manual. Barron Book Series. New York. Willkie, Tom. A Beginner’s Guide to Guinea Pigs. T.F.H. Publications.

Cavia porcellus (Guinea pig). (n.d.). Animal Diversity Web. https://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Cavia_porcellus/

Guinea pig pododermatitis (bumblefoot, sore hocks). (2020, September 3). Veterinary Practice | The UK’s leading monthly veterinary publication. https://veterinary-practice.com/article/guinea-pig-pododermatitis-bumblefoot-sore-hocks

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